Mobile games have room for divergent

Author: BobGames / Publish: 16/10/14 / Comments: 0
Footage from Device 6, from Vice UK.

Footage from Device 6, from Vice UK.

In as big as the mobile gaming market is not surprising that proposals based on differentiation are generated. And if we are talking about a global market, we would expect to find their audience, as long as the products are solid. There is a preconceived idea of ​​what it means to play. An incontrovertible truth, even when it comes to narrative designed for cell phones and tablets, more oriented to providing experiences to spend time and designed under the label ‘casual games’.

Stand why initiatives such unusual games as Simogo Swedish study, known since last year for being the perpetrators of Year Walk, game developed for iOS, Mac and PC and is highlighted by a gloomy atmosphere based on folklore his country, in which the protagonist must correctly follow some clues to not allow their dead omen to see his fiancee is met.

The rarity of the proposal has attracted attention from both users and experts in the field, as the publisher of video games for Vice Magazine UK, Mike Diver (MikeDiver), who in a recent article (http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/the-sailors-dream-and-simogos-challenge-free-success-story-283)outlines how to get away from convention, the Scandinavian could be creating a new segment in the market of mobile games, one interested in the deep and labyrinthine plots, against the preferences grounded in the action or the physical ability of the players.

“But unlike many mobile developers, their releases are not ones that you’re supposed to close 10 minutes in, when your station’s reached or the bus shows up”, he explains, referring to the common practice by users names like Angry Birds or Crush Candy.

2013 also saw the release of Device 6, winner of Best Mobile Puzzle Game Award by the Independent Games Festival. A game that this house literally fulfilled with the concept “puzzle”, and is described by Diver “an exploration adventure where your footsteps literally follow the text of the story”. Much text and few images in black and white, and the motivation to “elicit an emotional reaction.”

This year, the cover letter of Simogo is The Sailor’s Dream, which according to the description provided by the official website, will not have a linear storyline in which the player can explore words, music, sounds and illustrations.

In the new perspective opened by this developer in just two years, we still have to ask whether in Sweden video games for mobile would be destined to continue the line of distinction from other branches that historically have stood there like furniture design; very select products for audiences in these different approaches would find an answer to your need for status or mental challenges.

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